police Archives - Talking Guns


Joe LutrarioOctober 1, 20224min56030

It takes years of consistent work and effort. Once achieved, a new journey begins. The responsibility should be clear. Passing on the experience and knowledge to those who are on the journey and in need of a teacher. For some this may be a burden, others a delight. In reality it’s a lot of both.

It’s not nearly enough to just pass on technique, it’s not nearly enough to show what it takes to win a championship, it’s definitely not right to be a selfish player in a sport, and it certainly is unacceptable to just take the character, the knowledge and hide it away from all those who seek it. The only thing that’s acceptable is to be a commander, a coach and of course a teacher.

You see, Jiu Jitsu is a lifelong journey. It’s a “Triade”, a word from French origin meaning a trinity, a triangle. One side of the Triade is the self-defense aspect. Jiu Jitsu was developed as a means of self-protection. A way a person can defend themselves in a real life- threatening situation. We all know the stories of how Master Helio developed BJJ for people like himself. A smaller weaker person can be capable of fending off a much larger, stronger assailant. Without this angle there is no second one, which is the sport aspect of Jiu Jitsu. A way for one to test and hone their skills in a non-lethal manor. An arena where technique and sportsmanship come together to raise each other up and aide in the development of everyone’s “game”. That’s exactly what this angle is…a game.

These two angels sit atop of the third angle, a base which is called character. This base is the one that holds all three angles together. Not only does it prevent warriors and athletes from tearing each other a part, it teaches us how to be the best person we can be in all aspects of our lives. As we march through this sojourn we call BJJ, we learn from our training certain tools. Tools that teach us, prepare us and most importantly build us.  The base of this Triade gives us the experience and knowledge to be able to set the right example to all those who we come in contact with. It carries the load of enabling us to be the best commander and warrior, the best coach and the very best teacher of life’s values on and off the mat with the purest of heart. 

Without the proper AND equal development of each of these angles we lose the perfect, purest system of growth. As a Professor, it is our fundamental duty to ensure that each student grows and develops their own perfect Triade so they can some day pass that perfection on. Without the proper training in all three aspects of Jiu Jitsu one can never fully develop and what a selfish tragedy that would be.

 

Photo by Mike Kovacs



Joe LutrarioFebruary 22, 20225min40910

The BJJ academy has many “classrooms”, from the vestibules, the mats, to the locker-rooms. The people we meet in the vestibule are encouraging and delightful. The education we get on the mat is priceless. We all know the value of a great teacher and mentor. On a personal note, that is why I hold my professor, Milton Regis 6th degree black belt, in such high regards. Yet there is something enormous to say about the atmosphere and friendship that is built in the locker room.

When people struggle, sweat and face their fears together, there is a strong and special relationship that is formed. An intimate bond so to speak. Coming from a man that can’t remember what he ate for breakfast, let alone specific words spoken amongst a group of warriors, there is a deep feeling of peace, camaraderie, safety and vulnerability that one cannot ignore or forget.  

I have come to a point in my training where I finally realize that my opponent in front of me is not my only adversary. Just as a true warrior would never underestimate his physical obstacles, he would surely recognize and control the greatest obstacle of all…himself. We all can hear the little voice in our heads speaking to us before, during and after a fight. You know, the one that speaks volumes about how you “can’t do this and you can’t do that”. 

We can sit back deny, ignore or flat out lie to ourselves and others, but that won’t change the fact that it is our own worst enemy…and the most powerful one at that. Just as we come to master the basics of our game, we must also come to master the enemy within. This is a worthy and inevitable fight that all of us must conquer at one point in order to be successful. Only when one rises above and controls the demons of self doubt and self pity, can he grow to be the best he can be. Let me take it further, not just successfully grow on the mat, but to grow to extreme heights in all aspects of their lives. 

This is a battle that needs to be fought not alone, for the enemy within is too deceiving and too strong. Don’t misunderstand me, it can and will be defeated. It will be conquered as a team. A legion of warriors, training and learning together on the mat. Meeting in the vestibules, exchanging handshakes and subtle hugs. Most importantly, it shall be defeated in the locker-rooms. Here, here is where we are at our strongest. Outside the pit of anguish which we call our minds, in the midst’s of fighters, real friends who understand, share, encourage and most important believe in each other. Here is where lifelong bonds and pacts are made. Not just simply from voice boxes, but from ones gut and heart. The faith and belief we have in each other squelches the screams of self doubt. We hear only the whispers of our fellow fighters..Our friends. 

All people are born champions. However, it is only those who get tempered, molded and forged by the heat of battle that come to realize who they are and what they can achieve. We all reach the inevitability of this fight…rest assured my friends, I will be there standing side by side fighting with you, just as I pray that you stand beside me.

 

Photo by Mike Kovacs


Kioto-Southwest-BJJ-talking-guns-talkingguns.net_.webp

Joe LutrarioSeptember 2, 20213min55380

 

Anacondas are members of the boa constrictor family of snakes. Thus meaning they kill their prey by quickly striking and controlling their victim until it is too exhausted to fight, and their prey begins to suffocate. The will of the sufferer has been broken. 

Anacondas rely on stealth and the element of surprise to catch their unsuspecting prey. This jungle predator keeps its victim at bay, by controlling their actions while frustrating and exhausting its adversary. Taking advantage of its opponent’s weary and defeated attitude, the Anaconda methodically goes on the offensive and with precision; it only alerts its victim of their demise at a time when it’s too late.

 Like the Anacondas of the jungle, the great BJJ practitioner is a disciplined attacker. He is confident, patient and ready to attack at the most opportune moment. He quickly strikes, controls his opponent, matching move for move looking for the slightest light out of the tiniest window of opportunity given by his challenger or maybe even created by his own masterful mind. The BJJ artist acknowledges his adversary as a competent and dangerous foe. He engages in an active game of combat chess, exploding with bursts of speed and agility, while conserving energy and exalting exceptional deceit and precision.

The fighter is aware that in any given moment the tide can be turned. He realizes he must control the tempo. Too much wasted strength… too tired to continue. Too much hesitation…. he loses the race. The charmed grappler exalts a streaming flow between attacks and control leading to the final objective….submission.

The patient, free flowing contest on the mat is a way of life engrained in the champion fighter beginning at a time when the mat appeared to be nothing less than a jungle crawling with Anacondas and other fearless predators.



Jim SanfordJanuary 13, 20201min129920

Sneak Peak at Blackwater’s new 2011 pistol line up

These new 2011 weapons from Blackwater will be totally manufactured in house and loaded with some of the best features available.

Blackwater states ” Our goal is to provide a superior handgun than whats currently available, at a competitive price!”

Look for more info and a complete video review from www.talkingguns.net exclusive shot show coverage.

2011s will be available soon from www.blackwaterammo.com

 

Photos by Caleb Lash and Mike Kovacs



Brian KovacsMarch 11, 20196min353546

By Frank Drebin

Has the Governor’s Office and the Arizona State Legislature turned their backs on the rank and file employees of the Arizona Department of Corrections? It seems as though they have. The Department has not had a pay raise in approximately twelve years. That was during Governor Janet Napolitano’s administration. Think about that. Twelve years without a pay raise. Who does that? That pay raise was initially five percent but was reduced to 2.25 percent. It would take a raise of approximately 38 percent just to bring the Department to a competitive level with other agencies. Inflation continues to erode their paychecks, morale, and confidence that the State of Arizona will do anything to correct the problem.
There was much talk regarding a recent legislative bill to obtain a 10 percent pay raise for state corrections employees but that appears to have been shelved at this point. A 10 percent raise would not begin to compensate employees for what they’ve lost to inflation over 12 years. It would at least be a starting point and a gesture that the State of Arizona hasn’t completely forgotten the men and women that put their lives on the line daily to protect the citizens of this state. What I don’t understand is why this is happening. Why is there such tentative behavior to properly compensate employees of an agency that is in the death throes of failure. It certainly can’t be a monetary issue.
During his State of the State address in January 2019, the Arizona Governor called for increasing the Arizona Budget Stabilization Fund, also known as “the Rainy Day Fund,” to a balance of one billion dollars. He spoke of using the fund to protect teacher pay raises, to prevent budget gimmicks, band-aids, and potential future budget cuts. He also spoke of preventing tax increases, budget standoffs, and government shutdowns. We should not forget that Governor Ducey initially offered the teachers a two percent pay increase,and actually held a press conference to tout that as a success. Many teachers eventually risked everything and walked off the job for approximately one month to draw attention to their plight. They ultimately prevailed with a 20 percent raise with many stipulations. He was not championing their cause; he was politically vulnerable and had to act.
He also recently vetoed a measure that was backed by Republican lawmakers that would have cut Arizona tax rates to offset higher revenue the state expects to get because of a federal tax overhaul. It would have protected state taxpayers and effectively reduced state income tax rates by .11 percent. That is tantamount to a tax increase for most Arizonans, but the Governor believes that money should go to the “Rainy Day Fund,” not to Arizona taxpayers. The state has a surplus of approximately one billion dollars, excluding the windfall from the aforementioned vetoed tax cut measure. I also must mention the underhanded  $32.00 vehicle registration fee that was imposed by the Governor and legislature to pay for Highway Patrol operations rather than using gas taxes. Did you notice there was no mention of this fee during the election cycle? They didn’t raise taxes because it’s not a tax. It’s a FEE. Don’t euphemisms give you a warm, fuzzy feeling inside? I feel much better referring to a tax as a “Public Safety Fee.”
The Arizona Department of Corrections is in a state of crisis. The prison population is increasing while staffing continues to decline due to uncompetitive pay, attrition, poor morale, and inadequate working conditions. A recent landmark lawsuit against the state concerning inmate health care and conditions of confinement created additional workloads that the present system is ill-prepared to handle. Staff were already working long hours with burdensome workloads, and the additional stress is pushing many to a breaking point.
An entitlement culture developed within the inmate population as a consequence of the lawsuit and also because of Department officials willing to go to extreme measures to accommodate inmates. Officer assaults are on the rise but the Department continues to under-staff work areas while propagandizing that staff, inmates, and the public are safe. The primary issue is fair, competitive compensation. Until that issue is addressed the Arizona Department of Corrections will continue to hemorrhage corrections staff, and increase spending on overtime and training academies. More disturbingly, it will also continue to place staff and the public at risk. One thing is certain: They are running out of time.


Architekt JessMay 1, 20183min12820

I was in traffic the other day and passed by a police officer on a roadside traffic stop. I happened to glimpse his gun belt and couldn’t believe how much equipment was on there. It made me think of the past when most officers were only equipped with their duty weapon, spare ammunition, handcuffs, baton, and their common sense, good judgment, and communication skills. The equipment available to the street officer today is astounding. I’m not anti-technology and some tools have made the job safer and easier, however, I also believe that it has profoundly affected the interaction between police and the public. Take for example the stun gun. It was originally designed as a less-than-lethal tool but seems to have transmuted to a compliance tool. I believe that in some cases it became overused and replaced sound tactics and good communication skills. That of course led to the increased scrutiny of the device by the public and the media. All you have to do is access “You Tube” and you’ll find it replete with videos of alleged stun gun misuse and abuse. Again, I think technology has increased efficiency and safety in policing, but it has also created apathy and communication issues among officers in regard to public relations and community trust. Look, I get it. Everybody is busy, but at some point we have to look at what we’re doing and take more time to relate to each other. The payoff is big. The guy you spent a few extra minutes with talking into the back seat of your patrol vehicle versus increased time doing paperwork, supervisory scrutiny, and civil litigation because of a use-of-force incident. The scenarios are endless and obviously everything is situational. I’m certainly not implying that all police officers use poor judgment, have poor communication skills, or are apathetic. I do believe that many police departments need to increase training in communication skills and professional conduct, and hold their people accountable when there is a gross deviation from those standards. We need to bridge the gap between technology and human interaction if we are to foster respect and trust within our communities.